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Location:
TBD
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Jordan Hobbs, politicalscience@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Department of Political Science
Not sure where to get started with your polisci coursework? Come listen to Political Science professors give an overview of their research and the classes they teach! Pizza, soda, and other goodies are provided.
more about event
Location:
Alkek 250; 250
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Jordan Hobbs, politicalscience@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Department of Political Science
What did freedom of religion mean to the Founding Fathers? Dr. Vincent Phillip Muñoz contends that the principles which informed the Founder’s understanding of “freedom” are largely absent from modern conceptions, and argues that a return to their vision of freedom, natural right, and liberty is necessary to bridge partisan divisions.
more about event
Location:
TBD
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Jordan Hobbs, politicalscience@txstate.edu
Campus Sponsor:
Department of Political Science
Although Lincoln’s March 1865 Second Inaugural Address is considered one of history’s most compelling examples of political rhetoric, Dr. Diana Schaub argues its true character is seldom truly appreciated. Through a close reading of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, Dr. Diana Schaub places the speech in its historical context and explores its call for racial and national reconciliation and a politics of true moderation and greater humanity.
 
Dr. Diana Schaub is a professor of political science at Loyola University and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. Her work is focused on American political thought and history, particularly Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, African American political thought, Montesquieu, and the relevance of core American ideals to contemporary challenges and debates. She earned an A.B. from Kenyon College and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. From 2004 to 2009 she was a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics. Her books include   Erotic Liberalism: Women and Revolution in Montesquieu’s Persian Letters (1995), What So Proudly We Hail: America’s Soul in Story, Speech, and Song (2018), and His Greatest Speeches: How Lincoln Moved the Nation (2021). Her articles and reviews have appeared in a wide variety of journals including American Political Thought, Perspectives on Political Science, National Affairs, The New Criterion, and  Commentary, First Things, The American Interest, and City Journal, The American Scholar.
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Academic Dates & Deadlines